strobeadmin

Home \ STROBE Admin

About STROBE Admin

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far STROBE Admin has created 245 blog entries.

Information-rich Localization Microscopy Through Machine Learning

Artificial neural networks enable the extraction of multiple parameters, including spectral and depth information, from unmodified experimental single-molecule images for multidimensional super-resolution microscopy. Good color separation is thus achieved in fixed cells using two dyes ~80 nm apart in emission wavelength.

In Situ Coherent Diffractive Imaging

The Miao group at UCLA developed a new coherent diffractive imaging technique for capturing fast nanoscale dynamics. The concept leveraged time-invariant spatial redundancy in the field of view as a powerful constraint in the phase retrieval process. In addition, the introduction of high scattering features in the spatially redundant region also suggests the potential for dose-reduced imaging. Boulder and UCLA are collaborating to apply this in-situ imaging to materials undergoing phase transitions.

JILA Fellows Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn Win the Benjamin Franklin Medal for Physics

A husband-and-wife team at the forefront of laser science at the University of Colorado Boulder has followed in the footsteps of the Curies, winning a prestigious Benjamin Franklin Medal. The Franklin Institute announced today that Henry Kapteyn and Margaret Murnane would receive this year’s medal in physics—one of several awards handed out annually by the center named after the scientist and founding father.

The Challenges of Mastering Professional and Geographic Distance

Many important problems are attacked by putting together teams that span both professional distance and are geographically dispersed.

I have spent the better part of three decades studying such teams, identifying both the challenges involved and ways of meeting these challenges. I will review these, with illustrations from scientific project teams.

Keeping up with the Curies: Physicist team wins prestigious physics award

A husband-and-wife team at the forefront of laser science at the University of Colorado Boulder are following in the footsteps of the Curies, winning a prestigious Benjamin Franklin Medal.

The Franklin Institute announced today that Henry Kapteyn and Margaret Murnane would receive this year’s medal in physics—one of several awards handed out annually by the center named after scientist and founding father Benjamin Franklin.

Kapteyn and Murnane are fellows in JILA, a joint research institute between CU Boulder and the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). They have pioneered new advancements in X-ray lasers, devices that shoot out incredibly fast pulses of X-ray radiation.

Congrats to Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn for Receiving the 2020 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics

The Franklin Institute is pleased to announce The Franklin Institute Awards Class of 2020! Henry C. Kapteyn and Margaret M. Murnane, 2020 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics. Now in its 196th year, The Franklin Institute Awards pays tribute to our namesake and America’s first great scientist, Benjamin Franklin, by honoring the greatest minds in science, engineering, and industry. Our newest laureates are making our world safer, healthier, and more connected. They made revolutionary advances in laser technology, learned how forests recover from fires, uncovered the mechanisms behind color vision, and laid the foundation for artificial intelligence. Their work enables technologies never before thought possible and helps us better understand our planet and ourselves. They are mentors and role models for the next generation of science and engineering trailblazers. They are creating a better future for us all.

The Franklin Institute Awards

The Franklin Institute is pleased to announce The Franklin Institute Awards Class of 2020! Henry C. Kapteyn and Margaret M. Murnane, 2020 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics. Now in its 196th year, The Franklin Institute Awards pays tribute to our namesake and America’s first great scientist, Benjamin Franklin, by honoring the greatest minds in science, engineering, and industry. Our newest laureates are making our world safer, healthier, and more connected. They made revolutionary advances in laser technology, learned how forests recover from fires, uncovered the mechanisms behind color vision, and laid the foundation for artificial intelligence. Their work enables technologies never before thought possible and helps us better understand our planet and ourselves. They are mentors and role models for the next generation of science and engineering trailblazers. They are creating a better future for us all.

Congrats to Margaret Murnane for Receiving the 2019 CU Boulder Women Who Make a Difference Award

Mary Rippon, the first CU female professor, and Lucile B. Buchanan, the first African-American woman to graduate from CU, paved the way for women to succeed. These influential women were the first to accomplish what they did, but women who deserve appreciation surround us every day. The 2019 class of Women Who Make a Difference impact our community by serving as teachers, mentors, mothers and advocates. They write, they blog, they include and make countless other contributions big and small.

Recognizing women who make a difference

The 2019 class of Women Who Make a Difference impact our community by serving as teachers, mentors, mothers and advocates. They write, they blog, they include and make countless other contributions big and small.

Go to Top