Taoiseach Leo Varadkar Awards SFI St. Patrick’s Day Science Medal to Leading Physicist Prof Margaret Murnane and Technology Innovator David McCourt

March 14, 2018|Science Foundation Ireland|

Washington D.C., 14th March 2018 – An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar TD, has today presented Science Foundation Ireland’s (SFI) prestigious ‘St. Patrick’s Day Science Medal’ to Professor Margaret Murnane, Professor of Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Colorado; and David McCourt, Founder and CEO of Granahan McCourt Capital, for their significant contribution to academia, research and industry.

Now in its fifth year, the SFI St. Patrick’s Day Science Medal recognises the outstanding contributions of Prof Margaret Murnane and David McCourt in their respective areas, as well as their role in supporting and engaging with the research ecosystem in Ireland. The Medal is awarded annually to a distinguished Irish scientist, engineer or technology leader living and working in the USA.

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APS TV Features STROBE at JILA

March 2, 2018|APS TV 2018|

STROBE is featured in an APS TV video about what makes JILA a unique and great place to work. JILA is a unique research and training partnership between the University of Colorado and the National Institute of Standards & Technology. At JILA, scientists develop new research and measurement technologies that broadly advance science and the NIST measurement mission. To date, JILA scientists have been awarded three Physics Nobel Prizes. JILA also trains young innovators who become leaders in industry, academia, and government labs. And after traveling to the many laboratories housed at JILA, APS TV discovers that collaboration amongst its researchers is one of its greatest strengths.

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APS TV 2018 | JILA: An Amazing Place to Work Features STROBE Science & Technology Center

March 2, 2018|APS TV 2018, JILA Science YouTube Channel|

JILA is a unique research and training partnership between the University of Colorado and the National Institute of Standards & Technology. At JILA, scientists develop new research and measurement technologies that broadly advance science and the NIST measurement mission. To date, JILA scientists have been awarded three Physics Nobel Prizes. JILA is headquarters for two National Science Foundation Centers – the STROBE Science & Technology Center and the Physics Frontier Center. JILA also trains young innovators who become leaders in industry, academia, and government labs. And after traveling to the many laboratories housed at JILA, APS TV discovers that collaboration amongst its researchers is one of its greatest strengths.

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Tracking Energy Flow in Light-harvesting Systems on Native Nanometer and Picosecond Scales

February 6, 2018|Berkeley Lab Biosciences |

So Ginsberg and her colleagues devised a measurement that transforms an optical “super-resolution” microscopy known as STED (stimulated emission depletion) into a tracker of excitons on these short scales in an organic semiconductor. The technique makes it possible, for the first time, to relate the characteristics of exciton migration efficiency to nanoscale structures within light harvesting materials. “We ended up using the spatial profile of light pulses and the way that they interact with the material in order to excite very small and localized regions that have very sharp boundaries,” she said.

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Semiconductor nanosensor measures membrane potential

February 1, 2018|UCLA Chemistry and Biochemistry|

Professor Shimon Weiss leads team to develop nanosensors that can be directly inserted into a cell’s lipid membrane and be used to measure membrane potential.

The devices, which are based on inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles, could potentially record action potentials from multiple neurons as well as electrical signals on the nanoscale – for example, across just one synapse. Their paper, “Membrane insertion of—and membrane potential sensing by—semiconductor voltage nanosensors: Feasibility demonstration” was published in the January, 12, 2018 issue of Science Advances.

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UCLA study describes structure of tumor herpes virus associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma

January 19, 2018|UCLA Newsroom|

UCLA researchers have provided the first description of the structure of the herpes virus associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma, a type of cancer.

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Semiconductor nanosensor measures membrane potential

January 12, 2018|nanotechweb.org / IOP|

Researchers in the US have developed nanosensors that can be directly inserted into a cell’s lipid membrane and be used to measure membrane potential. The devices, which are based on inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles, could potentially record action potentials from multiple neurons as well as electrical signals on the nanoscale – for example, across just one synapse.

Image Courtesy: Y Kuo and S Sasaki / University of California, Los Angeles

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Synopsis: Plasmon Thermometers for Silicon

January 9, 2018|APS Physics|

Electron oscillations in silicon may be used to map, with nanometer resolution, the temperatures across a silicon device. Chris Regan of the University of California, Los Angeles, and co-workers have now developed a thermometry technique that, using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), could eventually map temperature in a silicon device with a resolution down to 10 nm.

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Opportunities in Intense Ultrafast Lasers: Reaching for the Brightest Light

January 2, 2018|The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, Medicine|

The U.S. is losing ground in a second laser revolution of highly intense, ultrafast lasers that have broad applications in manufacturing, medicine, and national security, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.  Currently, 80 percent to 90 percent of the high-intensity laser systems are overseas, and all of the highest power research lasers currently in construction or already built are overseas as well.  The report makes five recommendations that would improve the nation’s position in the field, including for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to create a broad network to support science, applications, and technology of these lasers, as well as for DOE to plan for at least one large-scale, open-access high-intensity laser facility that leverages other major science infrastructures in the DOE complex.

NSF, which has supported national centers of excellence, such as the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science at the University of Michigan (1991-2002),52 appears to no longer be directly involved in the development of high-powered or high-intensity lasers, except for some spin-off applications such as the new NSF STROBE Science and Technology Center at University of Colorado.

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Now recording: CU Boulder students, groups produce podcasts

January 1, 2018|Daily Camera|

“From the start, the project has been about giving a platform to voices usually not heard in science class — Latinx voices,” said Hernandez Charpak, who is now the assistant director of research and knowledge transfer at CU’s STROBE, a National Science Foundation science and technology center on real-time functional imaging.

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