About Lauren Mason

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So far Lauren Mason has created 55 blog entries.

Congrats to Laura Waller for Receiving the 2021 Optical Society (OSA) Adolph Lomb Medal

Founded in 1916, OSA is the leading professional organization for scientists, engineers, students and business leaders who fuel discoveries, shape real-life applications and accelerate achievements in the science of light. Through world-renowned publications, meetings and membership initiatives, OSA provides quality research, inspired interactions and dedicated resources for its extensive global network of optics and photonics experts.

Laura is being honored specifically for important contributions to the advancement of computational microscopy and its applications.

Adolph Lomb was OSA’s treasurer from its founding until his death in 1932.  In recognition of his devotion to OSA and the advancement of optics, the Adolph Lomb Medal, established in 1940, is presented to a person who has made a noteworthy contribution to optics at an early career stage.

She joins an esteemed group of past recipients recognized for their outstanding contributions to the field of optics and photonics.

Cryo-EM Specialization Postdoc

Yale Statistics and Data Science is looking for a postdoc in one of the most exciting computational imaging areas around, cryo-electron microscopy! If you’re interested check it out:

We are looking for postdocs with experience in cryo-EM and in developing scalable research software who are interested in developing algorithms that explore new perspectives on signal processing, Bayesian inference, variational inference and deep learning in cryo-EM (theory and applications).
The successful applicant will lead the development of a new research software platform and the exploration of new ideas. The successful applicant is invited to participate in managing the One World Cryo-EM seminars if they wish.
Relevant experience may include: Collaborative open source software development. Developing software for large scale cryo-EM problems. Collaborating with cryo-EM labs. Experience in signal processing (electrical engineering, applied mathematics). Experience with molecular dynamics, large scale MCMC, variational inference, or deep learning. Experience with JAX or lower layers of PyTorch or Tensorflow.
Apply at: https://www.mathjobs.org/jobs/list/16889.

 

Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn, who are also fellows in JILA, recognized for work in cutting-edge lasers

Two scientists who pioneered technologies for generating coherent X-rays, which helped propel research in dynamic processes in atoms, molecules and materials, have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, the academy announced today. Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn, physics professors at the University of Colorado Boulder, direct a laboratory in JILA, a joint institute of CU Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. They are among 175 inventors to be named 2020 National Academy of Inventors. Murnane and Kapteyn are co-inventors on 17 U.S. patents and have published more than 250 peer-reviewed journal articles. They are co-founders of KM Labs, a startup company that produces high-power, high-performance table-top laser systems.

Congrats to Yuka Esashi for Receiving the 2021 Nick Cobb Memorial Scholarship

Yuka Esashi has been announced as the 2021 recipient of the $10,000 Nick Cobb Memorial Scholarship by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, and Mentor Graphics, a Siemens Business, for her potential contributions to the field related to advanced lithography.  Esashi is pursuing her PhD in physics at the University of Colorado Boulder in the Kapteyn-Murnane group. She is co-lead of a research team that is addressing much-needed advances in metrology techniques for the semiconductor industry, where techniques with high resolution, fidelity and sensitivity are needed. With her team, Esashi has developed phase-sensitive EUV imaging reflectometry, a novel technique which combines computational imaging with EUV reflectometry to measure depth-dependent chemical composition of semiconductor samples in a spatially-resolved and non-destructive manner. In her current research, she is planning on applying this technique to a wider range of next-generation structures and materials. Esashi received her BA in Physics from Reed College in 2017, and her MS in Physics from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2019.

Postdoctoral Opportunity – Integrated Photonics

We are currently seeking talented and motivated postdoctoral candidates to join our group at the University of Maryland, working at the Laboratory for Physical Sciences on integrated photonic devices.  Our laboratory offers state-of-the-art research facilities, including access to nanofabrication facilities at LPS and through the Maryland Nanocenter, optical waveguide measurement, and high-speed photonic characterization tools.  The successful applicant will participate in existing projects and contribute to advancing our research program by investigating novel concepts and devices and proposing new ideas.

Essential skills and experience sought:

  • PhD awarded (or expected) in Applied Physics, Engineering, Physics, or related field
  • Excellent communication skills (in writing and speaking)
  • Basic cleanroom fabrication experience (lithography, dry etching, thermal processing, etc.)
  • Experience with measurement automation and data acquisition

Desirable skills include:

  • Nanofabrication and nanocharacterization experience (electron-beam lithography, AFM, etc.)
  • Hands-on experience conducting optical device measurements including integrated photonic systems
  • Numerical simulation of integrated photonic systems (FDTD, FEM)
  • Experience performing measurements in a cryostat

The University of Maryland and the Laboratory for Physical Sciences are located in the Washington DC Metropolitan area, which is not only a great place to live, but our proximity to many nearby collaborators, universities, government laboratories, and sponsors makes it an ideal place for a young scientist to launch a career.  The University also offers good benefits and competitive salary.

Starting date:  The position is available immediately, and interested applicants are encouraged to apply early for best consideration.  The position will remain open until filled.  Target starting of than May 1, 2021.

To apply, please send your curriculum vitae, along with the names and contact information of three potential references to photonicspostdoc@umd.edu

Native American Heritage Month at UCI: Franklin Dollar

Native American Heritage Month at Physical Sciences: This month, you’ll be hearing about Native Americans at the School of Physical Sciences, and how they make the School what it is.

I’m Franklin Dollar, a member of the Dry Creek Band of Pomo Indians and an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at UCI. I study ultrafast laser matter interactions, and how we can convert laser energy into beams of particles and X-rays for next-generation microscopes. I also try to understand how physics education can be improved, from mentorship, to curriculum, to environment.

PS: What advice do you have for Native American students who are considering a career in STEM?

The most important thing you learn with a degree like physics is how to solve problems in the real world. This is useful in nearly any career, and can provide the flexibility to try out different career paths. So though you may not know what you want to do today, as you work and learn you will be able to find your own path.

 

Charging-driven coarsening and melting of a colloidal nanoparticle monolayer at an ionic-liquid vacuum interface

Colloidal materials are a platform for studying self-assembly as well as the bottom-up creation of next generation hierarchical materials, and controllably perturbing their collective dynamics is an important step towards directing their assembly. In a liquid droplet, silica nanoparticles collect on the surface and organize to form an ordered 2D lattice. A STROBE research team led by Naomi Ginsberg (UC Berkeley) investigated these monolayers on a low vapor pressure ionic liquid, allowing experiments to be performed under the vacuum environment of a scanning electron microscope. Alongside imaging the particles, the electron beam serves as a perturbative tool for controllably charging the colloidal lattice. As particles charge, they sink into the droplet reducing the monolayer’s density and driving a melting transition. These findings will provide new insights for understanding phase transitions in soft materials and analogous atomic crystals.

Computer Vision for Imaging

This talk will discuss examples of computer vision algorithms applied to XRT, XRD and optical microscopy; it will also illustrate image transformations using Jupyter notebooks. Dani Ushizima PhD, is a Staff Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a Data Scientist at UC Berkeley and an Affiliate Faculty at UC San Francisco. In 2015, Ushizima received the U.S. Department of Energy Early Career award to focus on pattern recognition applied to diverse scientific domains, such as structural analysis of materials science samples. She is also recipient of the Science without Borders Researcher award (CNPq/Brazil) for her work on machine learning applied to cytology, as part of an initiative focused on public healthcare. She has also led the Image Processing team for the Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Related Applications (CAMERA). Recently, she’s been investigating lung scans for COVID-19 screening as part of initiatives related to the National Virtual Biotechnology Laboratory (NVBL).

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