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Congrats to Mary Scott for Being a 2020 Women @ The Lab Honoree

The Berkeley Lab Women Scientists & Engineers Council has announced that Foundry Staff Mary Scott and Liana Klivansky are part of the 2020 cohort of Women @ The Lab 2020 honorees. Congratulations to the honorees for their meritorious professional contributions, leadership, mentorship, and outreach.

This celebration highlights Berkeley Lab women and their success stories – scientists, engineers, and operations staff who are working to change the world for the better. By promoting the achievements of these 15 brilliant women, we hope to continue to inspire a new generation of women to enter the STEM workforce, where their participation could lead to important breakthroughs.

A COSMIC Approach to Nanoscale Science

COSMIC, a multipurpose X-ray instrument at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s (Berkeley Lab’s) Advanced Light Source (ALS), has made headway in the scientific community since its launch less than 2 years ago, with groundbreaking contributions in fields ranging from batteries to biominerals…

Family legacies that grew from FLC

The Sells-Wheeler Family By Natalia Sells

My name is Natalia Sells (Business Management, ‘18) and I am a second-generation Fort Lewis College alumna. My parents, Earlisa Sells (Student-Constructed Major, ‘06) and Leon Wheeler (Psychology, ‘06 and Student-Constructed Major, ‘07), started at FLC in 2004 when I was 10 years old.

Since we lived in Shiprock, New Mexico, my father commuted to Durango for his lecture classes every other day. Often, he would sleep in the family truck to save on gas and money. Sometimes he would take my siblings and me to the College, where he would reserve a corner window study hall room on the second floor of the Education Business Hall. I remember reading my book and looking out the window at the students changing classes. My younger sister, then three years old, sometimes sat with Dad in his lecture classes.

Prior to completing their degrees, my parents struggled to make ends meet. We witnessed firsthand how a college degree opens access to opportunities and financial stability. After graduating, my father worked as a history teacher at a local school and my mother’s pay grade increased. They were able to send us to a local college-prep high school, and through Dad’s job, we had health insurance. When they would go on their summer education trainings, we got to travel to different parts of the U.S.

After graduating from high school in 2014, I joined FLC as a full-time, ‘traditional’ student. With enough scholarships to afford my room and board, I was able to partake in campus culture. I graduated in 2018, debt-free, with my Business Administration degree and decided to pursue a career in higher education. My younger brother, Kyii Sells-Wheeler, started at FLC in Fall 2018, declaring a major in Engineering. After our dad, he is set to become the second man in our family to earn a bachelor’s degree. He has already been awarded multiple recognitions, like the Cobell Scholarship, Chief Manuelito Scholarship, and the American Indian Graduate Center Wells Fargo Scholarship.

Our family appreciates the affordability of Fort Lewis College and the opportunities higher education presents. Our parents’ story has made us appreciate the value of an education and how we can use it to help our own communities.

Congrats to Laura Waller for Receiving the 2021 Optical Society (OSA) Adolph Lomb Medal

Founded in 1916, OSA is the leading professional organization for scientists, engineers, students and business leaders who fuel discoveries, shape real-life applications and accelerate achievements in the science of light. Through world-renowned publications, meetings and membership initiatives, OSA provides quality research, inspired interactions and dedicated resources for its extensive global network of optics and photonics experts.

Laura is being honored specifically for important contributions to the advancement of computational microscopy and its applications.

Adolph Lomb was OSA’s treasurer from its founding until his death in 1932.  In recognition of his devotion to OSA and the advancement of optics, the Adolph Lomb Medal, established in 1940, is presented to a person who has made a noteworthy contribution to optics at an early career stage.

She joins an esteemed group of past recipients recognized for their outstanding contributions to the field of optics and photonics.

Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn, who are also fellows in JILA, recognized for work in cutting-edge lasers

Two scientists who pioneered technologies for generating coherent X-rays, which helped propel research in dynamic processes in atoms, molecules and materials, have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, the academy announced today. Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn, physics professors at the University of Colorado Boulder, direct a laboratory in JILA, a joint institute of CU Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. They are among 175 inventors to be named 2020 National Academy of Inventors. Murnane and Kapteyn are co-inventors on 17 U.S. patents and have published more than 250 peer-reviewed journal articles. They are co-founders of KM Labs, a startup company that produces high-power, high-performance table-top laser systems.

Congrats to Yuka Esashi for Receiving the 2021 Nick Cobb Memorial Scholarship

Yuka Esashi has been announced as the 2021 recipient of the $10,000 Nick Cobb Memorial Scholarship by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, and Mentor Graphics, a Siemens Business, for her potential contributions to the field related to advanced lithography.  Esashi is pursuing her PhD in physics at the University of Colorado Boulder in the Kapteyn-Murnane group. She is co-lead of a research team that is addressing much-needed advances in metrology techniques for the semiconductor industry, where techniques with high resolution, fidelity and sensitivity are needed. With her team, Esashi has developed phase-sensitive EUV imaging reflectometry, a novel technique which combines computational imaging with EUV reflectometry to measure depth-dependent chemical composition of semiconductor samples in a spatially-resolved and non-destructive manner. In her current research, she is planning on applying this technique to a wider range of next-generation structures and materials. Esashi received her BA in Physics from Reed College in 2017, and her MS in Physics from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2019.

Native American Heritage Month at UCI: Franklin Dollar

Native American Heritage Month at Physical Sciences: This month, you’ll be hearing about Native Americans at the School of Physical Sciences, and how they make the School what it is.

I’m Franklin Dollar, a member of the Dry Creek Band of Pomo Indians and an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at UCI. I study ultrafast laser matter interactions, and how we can convert laser energy into beams of particles and X-rays for next-generation microscopes. I also try to understand how physics education can be improved, from mentorship, to curriculum, to environment.

PS: What advice do you have for Native American students who are considering a career in STEM?

The most important thing you learn with a degree like physics is how to solve problems in the real world. This is useful in nearly any career, and can provide the flexibility to try out different career paths. So though you may not know what you want to do today, as you work and learn you will be able to find your own path.

 

What to Know if You’re Teaching Physics Labs Remotely

The coronavirus pandemic upended schools in the spring of 2020, sending students and faculty home. This rapidly changed how instructors handled laboratory physics courses. With a NSF RAPID grant, JILA Fellow Heather Lewandowski asked instructors what worked—and what didn’t—as they moved their lab courses online.

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