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Congratulations to Laura Waller for Being Named the Charles A Desoer Endowed Chair in Engineering

Charles A. Desoer was a professor emeritus of electrical engineering and computer sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. An endowed chair in Desoer’s name has been established in the College of Engineering. Laura Waller has been named the Charles A Desoer Endowed Chair in Engineering as of July 2022.

Congratulations to Daniel Durham for Receiving the Microscopy & Microanalysis Student Scholar Award

Congratulations to Dan for receiving an M&M Student Scholar Award! These awards are a joint effort with MSA’s sister society, the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and are judged on the quality of the two-page proceeding papers submitted to the M&M meeting. Between the two societies, approximately 30 of 200 annual student submissions are given the award. The award package provides complimentary registration to the M&M meeting, travel and lodging reimbursement up to $1,000, and an invitation to the Presidents’ reception. Awardees are recognized during the awards portion of the opening plenary session.

Congratulations to Ethan Anderson at Fort Lewis College for Receiving a Diversity Supplement from NIGMS and for Receiving the Best Poster Prize at the FLC Undergraduate Research Symposium

Ethan Anderson won the best poster award for “Fabrication of a physiologically relevant novel lung on a chip device to quantify extracellular matrix deposition” in Spring 2022 at Fort Lewis College. Ethan also received a Diversity Supplement from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Utilizing biodegradable porous silicon membranes as a novel design for lung-on-a-chip microfluidic devices to investigate extracellular matrix interactions.” Congratulations, Ethan!

Congratulations to Franklin Dollar for Being Recognized as a 2022 Kavli Fellow

Professor Dollar is now recognized as a 2022 Kavli Fellow, a joint endeavor by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine and the Kavli Foundation. He presented his work on high intensity laser matter interactions at the 2022 Kavli Frontiers of Science U.S. Symposium. Attendance to the symposium is by invitation only, and attendees are selected from among award winners for early career scientists in the U.S. and abroad. Attendees include Sloan Fellows, Packard Fellows, MacArthur Genius Grantees, Pew Fellows, Searle Scholars, and Presidential Early Career Awardees for Scientists and Engineers. Since the inception of the program in 1989, over 5,000 distinguished young scientists have attended a Kavli symposium and are designated Kavli Fellows.

Congratulations to Dr. Chen-Ting Liao for Being Accepted into the 2023 American Physical Society Career Mentoring Fellows Program

The APS Career Mentoring Fellows Program has accepted Dr. Chen-Ting Liao into their 2022-2023 cohort! The Career Mentoring (CM) Fellows program seeks physicists working in industry, government/national labs, or academia, who are interested in mentoring undergraduate students, learning and teaching about diverse career paths of physics degree holders, and establishing a stronger connection with the physics community.

Congratulations to Bin Wang for Receiving the 2022 SPIE BACUS Scholarship

Congratulations to Bin Wang for receiving the 2022 SPIE BACUS Scholarship! The SPIE BACUS Scholarship was set up in 1998 to reward the most qualified students who wish to work in the fields of photomask and microlithography manufacturing for the semiconductor industry. This award will partially assist with pursuing Bin’s career goals in the fields of microlithography, photomask technology and/or optical/EUV photolithography technologies.

The BACUS Steering Committee, in concert with the SPIE Scholarship Committee, will work with institutions of higher learning to identify candidates and award scholarships to help prepare them to make significant contributions to industry.

Colorado’s quantum revolution

In the 17th Century, a Dutch merchant named Antony van Leeuwenhoek began experimenting with making new microscope lenses and, in the process, plunged humanity into a new world—this one teeming with previously-undiscovered life, from small bacteria to single-celled algae and more.

More than 400 years later, scientists are in the midst of an equally-important revolution. They’re diving into a previously-hidden realm—far wilder than anything van Leeuwenhoek, known as the “father of microbiology,” could have imagined. Some researchers, like physicists Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn, are exploring this world of even tinier things with microscopes that are many times more precise than the Dutch scientist’s. Others, like Jun Ye, are using lasers to cool clouds of atoms to just a millionth of a degree above absolute zero with the goal of collecting better measurements of natural phenomena.

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